Georges Braque tapestry – 411

Georges Braque tapestry – 411

“Tête noire”
Hand-woven tapestries
Period: 1960
Dimensions: cm. 21 x 14
Signed GB
Atelier Dumontet (Aubusson – France)

SKU: 411 Categories: ,

Description

Georges Braque tapestry
(Argenteuil – France, 13 May 1882 – Paris, 31 August 1963)

“Tête noire”
Hand-woven tapestries
Period: 1960
Dimensions: cm. 21 x 14
Signed GB
Atelier Dumontet (Aubusson – France)

Georges Braque (Argenteuil, 13 May 1882 – Paris, 31 August 1963) was a French painter and sculptor, who laid the foundations of cubism, alongside Pablo Picasso. Analytical cubism came into being between 1909 and 1910, thanks to Picasso and Braque, who realised that, when a pictorial surface is split up too much, its individual fragments can no longer be virtually recomposed and the resulting work moves into the realm of abstractionism. Cubists, by contrast, did not want to lose the recognisability of the subjects they portrayed. Picasso and Braque carried these ideas forward into synthetic cubism, which was an evolution of analytical cubism, from 1912 until 1914, when Braque was called to the front.
With the collaboration of Juan Gris, they developed a series of techniques to get out of this paradox they had stumbled into, by following their methods of representing reality to their logical conclusion. They introduced fragments of reality and fragments of real objects into their paintings, combined with painted parts (collage); they used stencils with numbers or letters (mixed technique); they added “trompe l’œil” effects and replicated the grain patterns of wood, using the technique of combing the paint on the canvas while still wet.
They also embraced a return to colour and, more importantly, to an approach in which works are not spawned by observing real objects, but by creating simple, geometric shapes on the canvas, arranging them in various ways, at different angles or in cross-section, and only then, developing these shapes into the real objects they suggest. Reality is thus synthesised and created in the image. The objects on the canvas are no longer a copy of any counterpart in reality; they come into being once they are given material form in the pictorial image, before which, all that exists of them is a formal concept.

Bibliography:
Pierre Baudouin Tapisseries de peintres, Musée départemental de la tapisserie Centre Culturel et Artistique Jean Lurcat, Aubusson, 1991, p. 8
Pierre Baudouin 80 tapisseries de peintres, Musée-Galerie de la Seita, 1985

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